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Skin Test to check Allergicity

To identify those at greatest risk of systemic anaphylaxis, physician should strongly recommend skin testing before commencing treatment. A conservative, conventional approach would first employ epicutaneous (prick) testing with undiluted Thymogam. If the subject does not show a wheal ten minutes after pricking, proceed to intradermal testing with 0.02mL of a 1:1000 dilution of Thymogam in Sodium chloride injection with a separate Sodium chloride injection control of similar volume.

Observe the results every 10 minutes over the first hour after intradermal injection. A wheal of 3mm or greater in diameter at the site of Thymogam injection than that at the Sodium chloride injection control site (or a positive prick test) shows clinical sensitivity and an increased possibility of systemic allergic reactions.

Intradermal testing with 0.02mL of a 1:1000 dilution of Thymogam in Sodium chloride injection with a separate Sodium chloride injection control of similar volume. Observe the results every 10 minutes over the first hour after intradermal injection. A wheal of 3mm or greater in diameter at the site of Thymogam injection than that at the Sodium chloride injection control site (or a positive prick test) shows clinical sensitivity and an increased possibility of systemic allergic reactions.

Note :

The predictive value of this test has not been proved clinically. Allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis have occurred in patients whose skin test is negative. In the presence of a locally positive skin test to Thymogam, serious consideration to alternative forms of therapy should be given. A systemic reaction such as a generalized rash, tachycardia, dyspnea, hypotension, or anaphylaxis precludes any additional administration of Thymogam.
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